Ruben Barrera Gudiel, grade 9, Title: Namibia Desert National Park

Ruben Barrera Gudiel “Namibia Desert National Park”

Deiunive Estime, grade 9, "Florida Everglades"

Deiunive Estime “Florida Everglades”

Hannah, Lauren, Blaine, "The Desk of da Vinci"

Hannah, Lauren, Blaine “The Desk of da Vinci”

Jocelyn, Clint, Nathan, "The Master Cat of Creativity"

Jocelyn, Clint, Nathan “The Master Cat of Creativity”

 

 

 4,800 artworks received As of 9/1/16

About The Dream Rocket Project

DRP launched in 2009, is collecting thousands of artworks from various regions of the world. Eventually, all submissions will be connected side by side to wrap the skeleton of a 385′ Space Launch System (SLS) rocket replica. This wrapped SLS will be placed on temporary exhibit at locations around the United States. A project inspired by NASA’s mission to Mars and beyond. LocationsSLS_configuration of final installation and dates will be announced. We are locating venue hosts and exploring ways the SLS frame work might be constructed.  We have received submissions from individuals residing in dozens of countries, states and in hundreds of communities. Submissions are in the form of textile art accompanied by essays, progress images, reports and examples of innovative approaches inside classrooms across our nation.

Mather High School, Chicago, IL

Thomas Stone High School, Waldorf, MD DCPS@Inspiring Youth Program, Washington, D.C. Middleburg Community Charter School, Middleburg, VA

 

 

 

 

Zachary, Computer Information Systems, Class of 2019, "Drease the Sea"

Zachary, Computer Information Systems, Class of 2019, “Drease the Sea”

Dodge City Middle School students visit the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center 2.09.14Topics range from science, space, technology, conservation, education, freedom and equality. Prior to the final installation, submissions have been exhibited in libraries, schools, museums and community centers. Artworks have been displayed at 155 sites. →Originally, DRP’s intent was to wrap the 365′ Saturn V Moon rocket replica at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL from May-June 2015, however in October 2014 participants voted to pivot the project to reflect NASA’s current dream rocket, the SLS. 

Matt, Dakota, Brittney, Chantel "The Mind"

Matt, Dakota, Brittney, Chantel “The Mind”

“Our project shows what may have been going on in da Vinci’s mind. Some interesting things about da Vinci are that he didn’t believe in war and was a vegetarian. Da Vinci’s mind must have been full of his ideas. He designed inventions for war for some of his patrons. Science was also of great interest to him so he wrote about how the body works and sketched anatomy. He also included his observations about nature and art in his journals. Da Vinci was a person who liked to entertain many different ideas.” -Matt, Dakota, Brittney, Chantel

Students from the E.J. Harrington Elementary School in Lynn hold artwork for The Dream Rocket Project. From left to right: George Gomez, Nnenna Nwoke, Irma Rasidovic, Jadalize Guzman, Fatima Sierra, Britney Aguilar, Lydia Splaine, and Timothy Powell.

E.J. Harrington Elementary students hold their artwork, Read more in a recent Boston Globe article.

Kaitlyn, Rachel, Hallie, "Operation da Vinci"

Kaitlyn, Rachel, Hallie, “Operation da Vinci”

DRP estimates that by the time we have received our target goal of 9,000 submissions, nearly 36,000 people will have contributed to a monumental 32,000 square foot wrap. The social and economic benefits to youth and their communities reveals a vibrant and visible program, marked by collaboration from individuals in all economic sectors.

 

Aiden, "Da Vinci's Art and Concepts for Air Travel"

Aiden, “Da Vinci’s Art and Concepts for Air Travel”

Left Image: “The artwork depicts da Vinci and his famous artwork, The Mona Lisa, along with his concepts for air travel. Furthermore, artists, as creative problem solvers, may contribute to progress in future, air travel, including possible outer planetary explorations. Critical thinking skills developed through making art may offer the field of scientific investigation a fresh view of many problems seeking solutions, if there are opportunities to make a contribution.” -Aiden with Art Lab at DC Dance AZ, Scottsdale, AZ By exposing kids to the importance of collaboration through multi-disciplinary approaches we hope to inspire them to feel the freedom to DREAM big, THINK big and make a difference. By wrapping the SLS rocket replica with our dreams, the SLS exhibit can serve as an inspiring visual symbol of collaboration and perseverance.

Boonton High School, Boonton, NJ Leonia Middle School, Leonia, NJ Thomas Edison NP, 2016

Mathilda Lien, Angers, France "Things Could Be Otherwise..."

Mathilda Lien, Angers, France “Things Could Be Otherwise…”

Left Image: “I am participating in the Leonardo Da Vinci project “Collisions of Art and Science” because I like Da Vinci’s work, especially his anatomical drawings, and because the title of the project intrigued me. When I brainstormed for the project I put myself in Leonardo’s shoes. I imagined drawing elaborate machinery or human bodies. Leonardo emphasized a scientific approach. He was precise and attempted to be an objective observer. Yet, Leonardo’s “scientific” drawings are full of life and beauty. They are considered art. I realized then how I wanted to approach the project. I did not want to focus on a “collision” between art and science which emphasizes a violent clash of conflicting ideas. Rather, it seemed more appropriate to focus on the common thread between the two. I think the common thread between art and science is the desire and necessity to see how things could be otherwise, or to put it another way, to “think outside the box.” -Mathilda Lien

Cameron and Cody "daVinci - Art and Science Collision"

Cameron and Cody “daVinci – Art and Science Collision”

A monumental achievement that was marked by collaboration, the Saturn V moon rocket is still considered the only rocket to have carried humans out of the Earth’s orbit (until the SLS is successful): it is the ideal example of realizing an “impossible” dream. Over 500,000 people worked together to design and launch the Saturn V to the moon as part of the Apollo program during the 1960s and 1970s.

North Elementary Art Class (VA), working on their American Heroes-themed art submissions!

North Elementary Art Class (VA), working on their American Heroes-themed art submissions!

“Since these are project-based lesson plans with many different topics, they could apply to many different subjects, not just the arts. PBL (project based learning) has been shown to make learning more meaningful for students. It is also great that the lessons are all planned out (often with links right in the lesson to other media) so that teachers can put out quality lessons/topics in less time. I know that I am always on the lookout for ways to be more productive” – Mrs. Peterson-Shea, Art Teacher, Kansas On August 16, 2009 former CEO Larry Capps at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Alabama said, “It’s a very interesting idea. We’ve always focused our efforts on the notion of getting youngsters excited about their future, and this program walks hand-in-hand with that goal. So, if wrapping the rocket might influence some budding young artist, or scientist, then we’re behind it.”

Junction City High School, Junction City, KS

Highland Park High School, Topeka, KS BVB Poster Mather High School, Chicago, IL

 

 

 

photo_5

NASA Kennedy Visitors Center, FL

HILLER AVIATION MUSEUM exhibit Oct 14 - Nov 25, 2014

Hiller Aviation Museum, CA

“America’s new heavy-lift rocket will be the largest launch vehicle ever built and more powerful than the Saturn V rocket that carried Apollo astronauts to the moon. The 70-metric-ton-(77 ton) configuration will lift more than 154,000 pounds and will provide 10 percent more thrust than the Saturn V rocket while the 130-metric-ton-(143 ton) configuration will lift more than 286,000 pounds and provide 20 percent more thrust than the Saturn V. The first SLS mission—Exploration Mission 1—in 2017 will launch an uncrewed Orion spacecraft to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the SLS rocket and spacecraft prior to a crewed flight.” – NASA

Rufus M. Hitch Elementary School, Chicago, ILLewis and Clark Elementary School, Ruther Glen, VANorth Point High School, Waldorf, MDEllenville High School, Ellenville, NY

What does a park mean to you?

Jonathan B. Jarvis is the 18th Director of the United States National Park Service standing with students from Stamford Central School District, Stamford, NY in front of our exhibit at Roosevelt-Vanderbilt NHS.

Baldwin Junior High School, Baldwin City, KS

Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS Lewis and Clark Elementary School, Ruther Glen, VA

 

 

 

 

Honoring our Veterans

Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History and Director of the Hayden Planetarium, encouraged us to incorporate the dream symbolism into the project when we began working towards wrapping the Saturn V because; 

“The Saturn V is the ideal icon to represent a big dream. This rocket…allowed our human species to venture beyond our world and stand on another – surely one of the biggest dreams of all time. Enabling the dreams of young people to touch this mighty rocket sends a powerful message.” -Neil deGrasse Tyson

Wrapped Saturn V Collage Image: Exploratory drawings showing the “hoops” that would be suspended around the Saturn V without touching the rocket at all.

The Saturn V rocket is 363 feet tall, about the height of a 36-story-tall building, and 60 feet taller than the Statue of Liberty. Fully fueled for liftoff, the Saturn V weighed 6.2 million pounds, as much as 400 elephants. The rocket generated 7.6 million pounds of thrust at launch, creating more power than 85 Hoover Dams. NASA 

huntsville-space-and-rocket-centerImage: U.S. Space & Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama. (Left in photo) Full scale vertical Saturn V replica. (Right in photo) Full scale horizontal real Saturn V. — DRP worked from 2009 – October 2014 to find ways to wrap either one of these Saturn V’s, however, permission was only granted for the vertical replica version.

By Rachael Hixson "The Badlands: Do Not Enter" Franklin D. Roosevelt High School, Staatsburg, NY

By Rachael Hixson “The Badlands: Do Not Enter” Franklin D. Roosevelt High School, Staatsburg, NY

 

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Leonardo da Vinci: Collisions of Art and Science

DRP staff decided to create a digital exhibit of art submissions highlighting the above theme on the homepage of the DRP website from November 1, 2015 – November 30, 2016. Submissions will be posted below as they arrive.

Created by Waltham High School, Waltham, MA

Teacher: Mrs. Coughlan About this class project: Leonardo da Vinci was first and foremost and inventor and scientist. He is more famous for his paintings, of which not many are left. Some deteriorated due to his own experimentation with paint and mineral substances that did not stand up to time and atmosphere. DaVinci was fascinated with optics. Ahead of his time in everything, he observed the upside-down image of the external landscape on the opposite wall of a closed barn, projecting through a small hole where sunlight could penetrate. He developed this into a drawing tool for artists and draftsmen, used extensively up until the 19th century. There are now reconstructed ‘sheds’ to do exactly this type of thing again, San Francisco having one of the most famous ones. http://www.giantcamera.com/. Leonardo could dream big and observing the flight of birds, drew many plans for ‘flying machines’, helicopters, and things that would take men into the sky. It would be another 500 years before his visions came to reality. We have taken the photographs of the NASA satellite and translated them into abstract paintings. We used linen, which would have been used 500 years ago, but for paint we used acrylic, a plastic, ‘space-age’ polymer substance. If you look at the photographs (easily downloadable and free from NASA) you can see that these paintings are hardly abstract, but depictions of actual places on earth shown in a way that we would never be able to see unless they were photographed from space. This is full circle from Leonardo’s Camera Obscura (literally “dark room”), flight machines, and painting techniques in their purest forms in Renaissance Italy to modern day America.

Artist: Henrry Escamilla Monge, grade 9, Title: Guinea Bissau Coast

Henrry Escamilla Monge “Guinea Bissau Coast”

Artist: James Martinez Diaz, grade 9, Title: Akpatok Island

James Martinez Diaz “Akpatok Island”

Artist: Deiunive Estime, grade 9, Title: Florida Everglades

Deiunive Estime “Florida Everglades”

 

Artist: Ruben Barrera Gudiel, grade 9, Title: Namibia Desert National Park

Ruben Barrera Gudiel “Namibia Desert National Park”

Artist: Aaron Frederick, grade 11, Title: Volga River Delta

Aaron Frederick “Volga River Delta”

Artist: Gerson Sanchez Hernandez, grade 11, Title: Lambert Glacier

Gerson Sanchez Hernandez, “Lambert Glacier”

 

Julia Daigle 'Eastern Coast of Greenland in low-lying whirlpool of fog"

Julia Daigle ‘Eastern Coast of Greenland in low-lying whirlpool of fog”

Nelson Godoy Arriaza "Araca River"

Nelson Godoy Arriaza “Araca River”

 

Artist: Ledy Franco, grade12, Title: Broutona Island, Karman Vortices between Russia and Japan

Ledy Franco ” Broutona Island, Karman Vortices between Russia and Japan”

Artist: Emerson Vega Marroquin, grade 9, Title: Lake Carnegie, Western Austrailia

Emerson Vega Marroquin “Lake Carnegie, Western Australia”

Artist: Sonia Ourfalian, grade 9, Title: Richat Structure, Mauritania Desert

Sonia Ourfalian “Richat Structure, Mauritania Desert”

Artist: Vany Martinez Diaz, grade 9, Title: Yellowknife Wetlands

Vany Martinez Diaz “Yellowknife Wetlands”

 

Artist: Oscar Mendes Sosa, grade 9, Title: Dasht-e Kevir, or Great Salt Desert in Iran

Oscar Mendes Sosa “Dasht-e Kevir, or Great Salt Desert in Iran”

Evelyn Valdez Salazar "Aleutian Clouds"

Evelyn Valdez Salazar “Aleutian Clouds”

Lissaine Pinelo Pacheco "West Fjords"

Lissaine Pinelo Pacheco “West Fjords”

 

Artist: Jose Melgar Perez, grade 9, "Panara River Delta , Buenos Aires"

Jose Melgar Perez “Panara River Delta , Buenos Aires”

Artist: Michael Brown Jr., grade 9, "Guinea Bissau, Atlantic Coast"

Michael Brown Jr., “Guinea Bissau, Atlantic Coast”

Artist: Edgar Roca Portillo, grade 9, "Malaspina Glacier"

Edgar Roca Portillo “Malaspina Glacier”

 

Saurav Nakarmi "Dragon Lake, Southern Siberia"

Saurav Nakarmi “Dragon Lake, Southern Siberia”

 James Miller III "Greenland Coast"

James Miller III “Greenland Coast”

Kenny Lenh "Ganges River Delta"

Kenny Lenh “Ganges River Delta”

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Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Teacher: Mrs. Peterson-Shea

Clay, Colton, Trent "DaVinci's Codexs"

Clay, Colton, Trent         “DaVinci’s Codexs”

“Leonardo Da Vinci was a designer of many inventions that were advanced for his time. One of his inventions is called the “Aerial Screw”. It turned into the modern day helicopter. Another design of his is the parachute. Da Vinci created an armored war machine that eventually became know as the tank. His “Ornithopter” was an invention that was almost like a glider. He used his great artistic ability to sketch precise diagrams of the inventions. That is just a few of Da Vinci’s many advanced inventions.” – Clay, Colton, and Trent

Josh, Brock, Christopher, "Da Vinci's Inventions Put into Action"

Josh, Brock, Christopher
“Da Vinci’s Inventions Put into Action”

“Leonardo da Vinci was a famous, talented artists and a very intelligent individual. He had quite a few inventions and famous paintings, such as the Mona Lisa and the Last Supper. A couple of his famous inventions are the Aerial Screw and the diving suit. The Aerial Screw was a device used for flying and it also was an idea that eventually led to the helicopter. This device was designed to compress air to obtain flight. the Aerial Screw measured more than 15 feet in diameter and was made from reed, linen, and wire. While working in Venice da Vinci designed his Scuba Gear for sneak attacks on enemy ships from underwater. The leather diving suit was equipped with a bag-like mask that went over the head. One of da Vinci’s famous paintings is the Mona Lisa. The Mona Lisa has been the inspiration behind countless novelty items including clothing, jewelry, house wares, as well as having been used in many modern day advertisements. Despite many of da Vinci’s inventions we only have a few listed above, da Vinci was a very interesting guy and was able to advance art and science by drawing and inventing his ideas.” -Josh, Brock, and Christopher

Braden, Dalton, Trey, "Mona's Adventure"

Braden, Dalton, Trey             “Mona’s Adventure”

“Leonardo Da Vinci was a talented artist and intelligent inventor. Over his lifetime he invented many machines that are of use to our lives today. Of his inventions two commonly used today are the parachute and scuba gear. His parachute was triangular rather than rounded. Leonardo never built or tested the parachute he just drew a diagram of it in his journal. In 1500 Da Vinci came up with the idea of scuba gear, to attack ships from underwater. Just like the parachute Leonardo didn’t actually build it, he just had diagrams of it in his journal. Leonardo didn’t only invent things he also created very famous painting such as The Last Supper”, “Mona Lisa”, and “The Vitruvian Man”. The Mona Lisa” could be the most famous painting in the world. Between the years 1503-1506 it was painted, while Da Vinci was living in Florence. The actual painting is found today in the Louvre, in Paris. Leonardo lived the life of a passionate and intelligent inventor, who had an incredible open mind.” -Braden, Dalton, Trey

Chris, Dakota, Kolton, "Da Vinci Predicts the Future"

Chris, Dakota, Kolton                 “Da Vinci Predicts the Future”

“We decided to show Leonardo’s ideas transformed into modern day inventions. In his drawings he showed how he could transfer his artistic ability to science. His sketches helped shape the world that we know today so we decided to show them in a modern day physical form. We wanted to show how sketches and what modern day invention he predicted. His idea of the helicopter has evolved a lot from his ideas and sketches but still has some of the same components as he did. His tanks also predicted what we know today. Modern tanks still use the concept of angled armor because it makes the armor thicker and harder to penetrate if shot at. That’s why we decided to show his sketches and predictions in our art.” -Chris, Dakota, Kolton

Colby, Blake, Aryssa, "The Vitruvian Man, Give Me Wings"

Colby, Blake, Aryssa                   “The Vitruvian Man, Give Me Wings”

“Our piece represents a few of da Vinci’s ideas and creations throughout his artistic legacy. The wings, in this piece, are a representation of the glider wings that he sketched, but sadly never saw created. The Vitruvian Man represents the anatomy he studied. He participated in the dissection of cadavers and from his observations, drew detailed studies. On the circle around the Vitruvian Man we included the names of many of his inventions in order to call attention to his many areas of curiosity. He chose to use his artistic talent to illustrate his scientific observations.” -Colby, Blake, Aryssa

Morgan, Alyssa, Kayla, Kamrye, "Hands on Leonardo da Vinci"

Morgan, Alyssa, Kayla, Kamrye “Hands on Leonardo da Vinci”

“Everything that we do has a little bit of science in it. Leonardo had a lot to do with that. Science and art made up his life. He designed a lot of inventions like the machine gun, and the parachute, and paintings like the Mona Lisa, and The Last Supper. Although the inventions that he made took al lot of though, he always came back to them because they were so complex. The things that he studied helped him design and paint things like the Last Supper, or design the tank. The things that Leonardo studied inspire us still today.” -Morgan, Alyssa, Kayla, Kamrye

Jocelyn, Clint, Nathan, "The Master Cat of Creativity"

Jocelyn, Clint, Nathan            “The Master Cat of Creativity”

“Leonardo da Vinci was a great man with lots of inventions. Not only did he create many of the things we use today he also wrote in many journals about anatomy and was interested in art and science and how they can go together to better our understanding of things. Tons of stuff he he wrote we still use today. Many things he drew in his journal help surgeons still to this day. He also wrote and sketched his ideas and inventions such as the bicycle, tanks, and many of the things we use today which is amazing considering how long ago it was.” -Jocelyn, Clint, Nathan

Jaysa, Shaylan, Natalie, "Looking At da Vinci"

Jaysa, Shaylan, Natalie “Looking At da Vinci”

“Leonardo da Vinci was a great inventor. He was a great artist. Leonardo had brilliant ideas and was creative about it. He could design things and he could sketch and paint beautiful people. We created a journal that represents his art and science.” -Jaysa, Shaylan, Natalie

Samantha, Shelby, Taryn, "The Lisa Before TIme"

Samantha, Shelby, Taryn   “The Lisa Before TIme”

“Life is a mixture of art and science. Da Vinci shows that by his intricate drawings and paintings that he created throughout his life. Leonardo, like many of us, was a dreamer full of curiosity. He thought out and designed many things in his journals. Though there were failures, he carried on. He mixed life and art in the sketch called Vitruvian Man, which shows his studies of the human anatomy. The Mona Lisa was another piece that showed his knowledge of the human anatomy. He knew the bone structure of a face quite well from doing human body dissections. Leonardo once tried to invent an intricate machine resembling wings. These things lead us to believe he dreamed of impossible things and strived to better understand the things that are already possible.” -Samantha, Shelby, Taryn

Taya, Rheanna, William, "The Studies and Art of da Vinci"

Taya, Rheanna, William “The Studies and Art of da Vinci”

“Leonardo was very interested in many things. He studied space and astronomy. Our project has a large background of space to express this interest and to show his desire to observe, learn, and draw many different things that he learned. He put the knowledge he gained in his many journals. He was very inventive so we put many of his inventions into paint splotches on a paint pallet. Da Vinci also was interested in anatomy. He dissected human cadavers and drew sketches of the human body. Its been said that da Vinci even dissected a 100 year old man. The skull represents his studies in anatomy. Due to da Vinci’s artistic skill and scientific mind he was able to merge both talents to see the world in a whole new way.” -Taya, Rheanna, William

Hannah, Lauren, Blaine, "The Desk of da Vinci"

Hannah, Lauren, Blaine “The Desk of da Vinci”

“Leonardo da Vinci was a man of many interests. One of these was human anatomy. He combined his scientific and artistic investigations to come up with similar diagrams that we use today. He used cadavers to closely study blood vessels, tendons and muscles. Before dissecting his first human cadaver, he used animals, and studied their anatomy. These animal studies made his first human studies anatomically inaccurate due to the difference in layout of the anatomy of a human versus oxen, horses, bears, or birds. Leonardo used his knowledge in human anatomy to make portraits as accurate as possible. Da Vinci would draw humans of different types, young, old, men or women. He had filled 50 notebooks of sketches and facts about his studies. Leonardo da Vinci was considered a genius because of his many interests. -Hannah, Lauren, Blaine

Hunter, Colby, Daria, "Things He Designed"

Hunter, Colby, Daria “Things He Designed”

“Leonardo Da Vinci was a very talented artist and scientist. He had the talents of an artist but the curiosity of a scientist. He had an interest in geometry and many flying machines, like the wings he designed. He also designed the first auto firing weapon. It was set up so when it was first fired another set of barrels would go off after. Leonardo had many incredible inventions and ideas. He was advanced for his time.” -Hunter, Colby, Daria

Kaitlyn, Rachel, Hallie, "Operation da Vinci"

Kaitlyn, Rachel, Hallie “Operation da Vinci”

“Leonardo da Vinci, the father of the Renaissance was a man of many abilities. Of those abilities, includes science and art. He used his anatomical findings and included those in his paintings and other artwork. We chose to base our poster off of the board game Operation. We want to depict da Vinci’s love of anatomy and dissections and blend that with his artwork. Da Vinci was the first person to accurately depict a human spine; therefore, inside our operation man is a spine. There will also be a calculator, clock, goggles, and paintbrush to represent his scientific findings and artistic drawings. We also chose to add a quote because da Vinci had the mindset similar to a child his whole life. He never wanted to stop learning.” -Kaitlyn, Rachel, Hallie

Laressa, Sierra, Joseph, Sydnee, "Science of Art"

Laressa, Sierra, Joseph Sydnee “Science of Art”

“Leonardo da Vinci was many things. He was an inventor, a mathematician, an explorer, and a musician. Most importantly he was both a scientist and an artist. His ability to draw well allowed him express many thing; his ideas, his inventions, and his plans for new inventions ahead of their time: the parachute, a tank, and even a diving suit. His curiosity about the world around him lead him to study things that no one else had even considered. His dissection of corpses and study of anatomy allowed him to excel at painting and drawing. He made astute observations in all areas that he was interested in. Leonardo da Vinci was many things and he created journals that contained drawings and his writing. His drawings of the human anatomy are so accurate due to his artistic talent and scientific methods, that they can be still used to this day. He will to continue to have an influence on this world for many years still to come. -Laressa, Sierra, Joseph

Alyssa, Jace, Nate, Seth, "Da Vinci's Notebook"

Alyssa, Jace, Nate, Seth      “Da Vinci’s Notebook”

“Da Vinci kept notebooks of biology, science, engineering and art. He studied anatomy in order to portray the human body correctly. Also, he drew a lot of inventions that we still use today. He created a design for a helicopter, but it was never built. The notebooks are filled with mirror handwriting and he kept them his whole life. After he died his notebooks went into the possession of of his apprentice, Francesco Melzi. If the notebooks would have been published at the time of his death, we would be much more advanced today. However, Melzi’s heirs had little respect for them. They eventually sold them and gave them away to their friends. Today the notebooks have been copied and are now in the British Library of London.” -Alyssa, Jace, Nate, Seth

Alyssa, Jace, Nate, Seth "Da Vinci's Notebook"

Alyssa, Jace, Nate, Seth “Da Vinci’s Notebook”

Da Vinci kept notebooks of biology, science, engineering and art. He studied anatomy in order to portray the human body correctly. Also, he drew a lot of inventions that we still use today. He created a design for a helicopter, but it was never built. The notebooks are filled with mirror handwriting and he kept them his whole life. After he died his notebooks went into the possession of his apprentice, Francesco Melzi. If the notebooks would have been published at the time of his death, we would be much more advanced today. However, Melzi’s heirs had little respect for them. They eventually sold them and gave them away to their friends. Today the notebooks have been copied and are now in the British Library of London.

Ben, Jasmine, Gage, Konner "The Flight Guide"

Ben, Jasmine, Gage, Konner                          “The Flight Guide”

“Leonardo da Vinci had a fascination with mortality and flight. In the winter of 1507-08 he met a man that was 100 years old and didn’t feel like he was dying, but died later that day at the hospital of Santa Maria Nuova. This was the first person Leonardo dissected to see what caused his death. By the end of 1508 da Vinci had dissected 9 corpses. He was very fascinated with the possibility of human mechanical flight. He wrote more than 35,000 words and created 500 sketches dealing with flying machines, the nature of air, and bird flight in his coda on the flight of birds. One of his machines was the glider. He focused on making the design of wings like a bat and large bird wings. After observing birds he noticed that innermost section of the wings moved slower that the outer section of the wings, so you had to sustain rather than push forward. Leonardo never got to see man fly. His ideas on mortality and anatomy are very well known and used today.” -Ben,    Jasmine, Gage, Konner

Katelyn, Kristina, Ashley, Alexis "The Mind of Leomardo da Vinci"

Katelyn, Kristina, Ashley, Alexis                  “The Mind of Leomardo da Vinci”

“Leonardo da Vinci had many great ideas and inventions. Our project depicts the inside of Leonardo da Vinci’s mind. Although flight had not yet been invented it was constantly on his mind. His dream was to create a device that would keep someone in the air after jumping out of a plane. This is why Leonardo da Vinci created the parachute. In addition to his interest in flight, he was also very interested in the way the clock worked. Leonardo wanted to know how it worked and how to make it better. Therefore, he discovered that gears would make the clock work better and be more efficient. Leonardo loved studying nature. He studied things such as trees, plants and animals. His interest in things was so great that he was always trying to learn more about them and breaking them down. In conclusion, Leonardo had many thoughts and ideas that helped the world advance.” -Katelyn, Kristina, Ashley, Alexis   ______________________________________________________

Created by Hart County High School, Munfordville, KY

Teacher: Mrs. Glaab “Our students looked at da Vinci as an artist and as a scientist and then collaborated on how to create a fiber artwork that would showcase da Vinci and his inventions.”

Cameryn and Kaylie "Bridge over Peaceful Water"

Cameryn and Kaylie “Bridge over Peaceful Water”

Lynda and Sara "Up, Up & Away!"

Lynda and Sara            “Up, Up & Away!”

Cameron and Cody "daVinci - Art and Science Collision"

Cameron and Cody “daVinci – Art and Science Collision”

 

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Created by University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, TX

STEM Freshman Success Course Teacher: Mrs. Altamirano Theme: Leonardo da Vinci – Collusions of Art & Science

Zachary and Isabel, Class of 2019, "Odometer"

Zachary and Isabel, Class of 2019, “Odometer”

Savon, Mechanical Engineering, Class of 2019, "Flying Machine"

Savon, Mechanical Engineering, Class of 2019, “Flying Machine”

Cameron, Mechanical Engineering, Class of 2019, "Aerial Screw"

Cameron, Mechanical Engineering, Class of 2019, “Aerial Screw”

Elies, Biomedical Engineering, Class of 2019, "Aviation from Imagination"

Elies, Biomedical Engineering, Class of 2019, “Aviation from Imagination”

 

Hernan, C.I.S., Class of 2019, "Odometer"

Hernan, C.I.S., Class of 2019, “Odometer”

Nichelas, "Gyrocopter"

Nichelas, “Gyrocopter”

Isabel Altamirano, "Odometer"

Isabel Altamirano, “Odometer”

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Created by PS#23, Jersey City, NJ

Title: Inventions Teacher: Mrs. Taylor Theme: Leonardo da Vinci: Collisions of Art and Science Materials and techniques: Watercolor paint, paper ,cloth, and markers. Did you enjoy this project? Immensely. About: Students were to imitate Leonardo da Vinci by creating original designs of the invention they would like to create.

Artists: Bachir, Abner and Xavier "Inventions"

Bachir, Abner and Xavier

Artists: Ashton and Sreekar "Inventions"

Ashton and Sreekar

Artists: Aidan, Azhaun and David "Inventions"

Aidan, Azhaun and David

 

Mohamed, Fear and Dhairya "Inventions"

Mohamed, Fear and Dhairya

Nancy, Anasjia and Marium "Inventions"

Nancy, Anasjia and Marium

Toka, Jenna and Sadhana

Toka, Jenna and Sadhana

 

Nabil, Muzzammil, Kourthyn and Sakina

Nabil, Muzzammil, Kourthyn and Sakina

 


Created by Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY

Teachers: Ms. D. Fava, Ms. Mazahreh, Ms. McGrath, Ms. Auchmoody Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY       Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY Yonkers Montessori Academy, Yonkers, NY           ___________________________________________________________

Created by Hart County High School, Munfordville, KY

Artists: Michael and ZachHart County High School, Munfordville, KY

Title: Electrifying Notes

Teacher: Mrs. Glaab

Materials and techniques: Linen, cotton material, acrylic paint, wood, fiber fill, Photoshop, colored pencil, beach ball, construction paper, and leather.

About: Our students looked at daVinci as an artist and as a scientist and then collaboration began on how to create a fiber art that would showcase daVinci and his inventions.

IMG_1809 IMG_1811 IMG_1813

 

Artists: Elena, Frieda, Megan

Title: Art Meets Science