International Fiber Collaborative, Inc. receives grant from Kansas Humanities Council

International Fiber Collaborative, Inc. receives grant from Kansas Humanities Council
This program is funded by the Kansas Humanities Council

This program is funded by the Kansas Humanities Council

NEWS RELEASE

NOVEMBER 29, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE               

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT JENNIFER MARSH PROJECT DIRECTOR

International Fiber Collaborative, Inc. 1125 SW Taylor St, Topeka, Kansas 66612 (614) 561 – 9057, Jennifer@thedreamrocket.com   

International Fiber Collaborative, Inc. receives grant from Kansas Humanities Council

TOPEKA – The Kansas Humanities Council (KHC) recently awarded the International Fiber Collaborative, Inc. of Topeka a $5,927 grant in support of the “100 Years of Agriculture: Past, Present, and Future” exhibition and public programs. Jennifer Marsh serves as the project director.“Using the theme ‘100 Years of Agriculture: Past, Present, and Future’ we will collect 100 interpretations shared through textile art accompanied by interviews and essays from individuals across Kansas. Submissions will be included in five exhibitions coinciding with a series of public lectures and discussions. All exhibits, public lectures, and activities are open to the public. As a tribute to the stories expressed there will be a featured exhibit at the Kansas State Fair from September 7-16, 2013.”

Exhibitions include:
Kiowa County Library, Greensburg, KS, April 1 – 30th
Kingman Carnegie Library, Kingman, KS, April 1 – 30th
West Wyandotte Library, Kansas City, KS, June 1 – 30th
Salina Public Library, Salina, KS, August 1 – 29th
Kansas State Fair, Hutchinson, KS, September 7 -16th

The International Fiber Collaborative (IFC), founded in 2008 with established roots in Huntsville, AL and Topeka, KS, develops community programs that create collaborative opportunities in the arts and humanities. IFC programs have successfully generated participation from individuals in 515 cities, 50 states, and 19 countries. Public programming has been a catalyst for creativity in health care facilities, libraries, schools, museums, and other locations, and has generated 18,528 submissions collected from an estimated 13,058 individuals as part of three major projects. IFC’s current initiative, The Dream Rocket Project, has exhibited submissions in 101 venues in 24 states, including 26 libraries in Kansas. “KHC Humanities grants support projects that connect people with ideas and engage audiences with the humanities,” said Julie Mulvihill, executive director of the Kansas Humanities Council. “The ‘100 Years of Agriculture’ project is an innovative way for Kansans to reflect upon the role of agriculture in their life and community.” 

The Kansas Humanities Council is a nonprofit organization that supports community-based cultural programs, serves as a financial resource through an activegrant-making program, and encourages Kansans to engage in the civic and culturallife of their communities. 

For more information, visit www.kansashumanities.org.