Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Elizabeth, Laressa, William

Teachers: Mrs. Peterson-Shea, Mr. Kendall Fiscus

Title: Segregated Schools

Theme: Expressions of Freedom and Equality

Materials and techniques: Acrylic paint, printed on words

Did you enjoy this project? Yes, we learned a lot from this experience.

About: We are drawing about the separate but equal law. In 1896 the case of
Plessy v. Ferguson, the court ruled that it was not illegal to be separate
as long as they are equal. But the states didn’t change anything. The
schools still stayed unequal. Many colored schools didn’t have a lunch
hall or a gym and they had to stay in a small building with k-12.
Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Suzanne, Alex, Alyssa

Teachers: Mrs. Peterson-Shea and Mr. Kendall Fiscus

Title: Is Separate Equal?

Theme: Expressions of Freedom and Equality

Materials and techniques: Acrylic paints, markers, colored pencil

Did you enjoy this project? Yes, gaining this new experience has helped our group understand the civil rights movement more in-depth.

About: On May 17, 1954 the Supreme Court handed down its ruling of the Brown
v. Board of Education. The court’s decision overturned the Plessy v.
Ferguson decision, which allowed “Separated but equal” public facilities,
which included public schools. The Brown v. Board of Education stated
that separate schools are unequal. The Brown v. Board provided a spark
to the American Civil Rights movement. They showed us how “equal
rights” are not exactly equal.

Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Shylin, Blake, Matt

Teachers: Mrs. Julie Peterson-Shea, Mr. Kendall Fiscus

Title: United We Stand

Theme: Expressions of Freedom and Equality

Materials and techniques: Colored pencils

Did you enjoy this project? Yes, we all believe that this project has influenced us in some way.

About: For the art we are doing, we are incorporating a bus, the American flag, and two hands stretching out to each other. In this meaning, the people have been segregated. The black race was treated cruelly because the whites didn’t like the color of their skin. This piece of art signifies the segregation in the time of Brown v. Board. Holding back an innocent child from getting her education. The symbols in the art show mostly how bad it was back in the day.
Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Alexis Chavez, Katelyn Swanson, Orianna Ratzlaff, Chelsea Lumpkin

Teachers: Mrs. Peterson-Shea and Mr. Kendall Fiscus

Title: Separate but Not Equal

Theme: Expressions of Freedom and Equality

Materials and techniques: Acrylic paints

About: Separate but equal was a legal doctrine in the United States constitutional law
that justified and permitted racial segregation. Under the doctrine, the government was allowed to require that services , facilities, public accommodations, housing, medical cares, education, employment, and transportation be separated along racial lines, provided that the quality of each public facilities was equal. The doctrine was overturned by the Supreme Court decisions starting with the Brown vs. Board of Education in 1954, however, the
overturning of legal separation laws in the United States was a long process that
lasted through much of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s involving many court cases
and federal legislation.

Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Zach and Dakota

Teachers: Mrs. Peterson-Shea and Mr. Kendall Fiscus

Title: Brown v. Board Water Fountains

Theme: Expressions of Freedom and Equality

Materials and techniques: Colored pencils, markers

About: We are going to draw two water fountains. The water fountain for the whites is brand new. But the water fountain for the blacks is the cheapest water fountain that the business could buy. It’s very leaky and held together by a roll of duct tape. The white fountain is cleaned every day and the black fountain is never cleaned.
Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Jillian and Kameron

Teachers: Mrs. Peterson-Shea and Mr. Kendall Fiscus

Title: Is Separate Really Equal

Theme: Expressions of Freedom and Equality

Materials and techniques: Colored pencil, marker

About: Our drawing represents the separation between whites and blacks with different doorways. The whites’ doorway was very well lit while the blacks’ doorway was barely lit at all. This shows how separate and unequal it was back then. This is important to us because we think that this is outrageous how unequal things were back then and how crucial it was for change.
Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Ashley, Donovan, Austin

Teachers: Mrs. Peterson-Shea and Mr. Kendall Fiscus

Title: Unequal Education

Theme: Expressions of Freedom and Equality

Materials and techniques: Colored pencils

Did you enjoy this project? Yes, getting this new experience was helpful for many of us.

About: In 1954 the Supreme Court took on the case, Brown vs. Topeka Board of
Education. One part of this case, Briggs v. Elliott, dealt with the issue of
colored students not having access to bussing to and from school. In our
project this is expressed by a bus passing a colored student’s home which is five miles away from their school. Showing the inequality between white and colored students in the state of South Carolina.
Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Hannah, Hunter, Conner

Teachers: Mrs. Peterson-Shea and Mr. Kendal Fiscus

Title: Separate, but not Equal

Theme: Expressions of Freedom and Equality

Materials and techniques: Colored pencils

Did you enjoy this project? Yes, we all enjoyed learning in a new way.

About: Separate but equal doesn’t quite explain how segregation worked in the 1950s. Take bus rides in Louisiana and Alabama for example. The white people were supplied with buses to get to school while the African Americans were forced to walk. Despite the distances between schools, the colored citizens were still forced to walk to their destinations. Our picture shows how the white people got to ride in buses and the colored people had to walk.