Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS
Alyssa, Jace, Nate, Seth "Da Vinci's Notebook"

Alyssa, Jace, Nate, Seth “Da Vinci’s Notebook”

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Alyssa, Jace, Nate, Seth

Teacher: Mrs. Peterson-Shea

Title: Da Vinci’s Notebook

Theme: Leonardo da Vinci: Collisions of Art and Science

Materials and techniques: Spray paint, acrylic paint, and permanent markers on canvas.

Did you enjoy this project? Yes.

About: Da Vinci kept notebooks of biology, science, engineering and art. He studied anatomy in order to portray the human body correctly. Also, he drew a lot of inventions that we still use today. He created a design for a helicopter, but it was never built. The notebooks are filled with mirror handwriting and he kept them his whole life. After he died his notebooks went into the possession of his apprentice, Francesco Melzi. If the notebooks would have been published at the time of his death, we would be much more advanced today. However, Melzi’s heirs had little respect for them. They eventually sold them and gave them away to their friends. Today the notebooks have been copied and are now in the British Library of London.

Ben, Jasmine, Gage, Konner "The Flight Guide"

Ben, Jasmine, Gage, Konner “The Flight Guide”

 

Created by Phillipsburg High School, Phillipsburg, KS

Artists: Ben, Jasmine, Gage, Konner

Teacher: Mrs. Peterson-Shea

Title: The Flight Guide

Theme: Leonardo da Vinci: Collisions of Art and Science

Materials and techniques: Permanent marker on canvas.

Did you enjoy this project? Yes.

About: Leonardo da Vinci had a fascination with mortality and flight. In the winter of 1507-08 he met a man that was 100 years old and didn’t feel like he was dying, but died later that day at the hospital of Santa Maria Nuova. This was the first person Leonardo dissected to see what caused his death. By the end of 1508 da Vinci had dissected 9 corpses. He was very fascinated with the possibility of human mechanical flight. He wrote more than 35,000 words and created 500 sketches dealing with flying machines, the nature of air, and bird flight in his coda on the flight of birds. One of his machines was the glider. He focused on making the design of wings like a bat and large bird wings. After observing birds he noticed that innermost section of the wings moved slower that the outer section of the wings, so you had to sustain rather than push forward. Leonardo never got to see man fly. His ideas on mortality and anatomy are very well known and used today.