Munfordville School, Munfordville, KY

Munfordville School, Munfordville, KY

Created by Munfordville School, Munfordville, KY

Artists: Joshua, Aryonna, Aline, Debra, Brooklyn, Makayla, Macey, Krysta, Haylee, Audrey, Jaylynn, Ethan, Molly, Hannah, Sara

Title: Life in the Cave

Teacher: Mrs. Sims

Theme: Conservation

Materials and techniques: We created monotype prints on fabric using acrylic paint, gelli plates and stencils. The cyanotype prints were made by mixing potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate together to make a light sensitive chemical that was brushed onto stretched fabric that was attached to a board in a dark room. Once the material dried it was placed in a black plastic bag until it was ready to be exposed to sunlight. The images that were used on the cyanotype prints came from the internet and were manipulated in the photo editing software, Pixlr. The images were converted into an old photograph and then the image was inverted to create a negative. This negative was printed on inkjet transparency paper and then the image was placed over the prepared fabric. It was taken outside and exposed in to the sun for 30-40 minutes. Then the material was taken inside and removed from the board it had been stretched on and washed to get the chemical out. Finally, the fabric was put in a water bath with hydrogen peroxide to stop the fabric from exposing any further. The last step in creating our pieces this year was to arrange all of the pieces that were created and then sew all of the pieces of fabric together.

Did you enjoy this project? We enjoyed working on the pieces for Mammoth Cave and learning new ways to do printmaking.

About: Living close to Mammoth Cave National Park it is a treasure that many take for granted. The beauty that lies above and below the surface of the cave is breathtaking. The ecosystem of the cave and the wildlife and vegetation that make-up the park create a gem that we are blessed to have access to. In our pieces this year we wanted to showcase the complexity of Mammoth Cave National Park and the beauty of the cave, animals and plants. We wanted to show images that people would be familiar with, but to create them in a unique manner. We chose to create the images using cyanotype prints or more commonly known as “sun prints”. These images were sewn together with other pieces of fabric that had been printed using gelli plate to create monotype prints. The composition of the pieces shows the diversity of the park with its images, colors and textures.

Created by Munfordville School, Munfordville, KY

Artists: Joshua, Aryonna, Aline, Debra, Brooklyn, Makayla, Macey, Krysta, Haylee, Audrey, Jaylynn, Ethan, Molly, Hannah, Sara

Title: Life Above the Cave

Teacher: Mrs. Sims

Theme: Conservation

Materials and techniques: We created monotype prints on fabric using acrylic paint, gelli plates and stencils. The cyanotype prints were made by mixing potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate together to make a light sensitive chemical that was brushed onto stretched fabric that was attached to a board in a dark room. Once the material dried it was placed in a black plastic bag until it was ready to be exposed to sunlight. The images that were used on the cyanotype prints came from the internet and were manipulated in the photo editing software, Pixlr. The images were converted into an old photograph and then the image was inverted to create a negative. This negative was printed on inkjet transparency paper and then the image was placed over the prepared fabric. It was taken outside and exposed in to the sun for 30-40 minutes. Then the material was taken inside and removed from the board it had been stretched on and washed to get the chemical out. Finally, the fabric was put in a water bath with hydrogen peroxide to stop the fabric from exposing any further. The last step in creating our pieces this year was to arrange all of the pieces that were created and then sew all of the pieces of fabric together.

Did you enjoy this project? We enjoyed working on the pieces for Mammoth Cave and learning new ways to do printmaking.

About: Living close to Mammoth Cave National Park it is a treasure that many take for granted. The beauty that lies above and below the surface of the cave is breathtaking. The ecosystem of the cave and the wildlife and vegetation that make-up the park create a gem that we are blessed to have access to. In our pieces this year we wanted to showcase the complexity of Mammoth Cave National Park and the beauty of the cave, animals and plants. We wanted to show images that people would be familiar with, but to create them in a unique manner. We chose to create the images using cyanotype prints or more commonly known as “sun prints”. These images were sewn together with other pieces of fabric that had been printed using gelli plate to create monotype prints. The composition of the pieces shows the diversity of the park with its images, colors and textures.

Created by Munfordville School, Munfordville, KY

Artists: Joshua, Aryonna, Aline, Debra, Brooklyn, Makayla, Macey, Krysta, Haylee, Audrey, Jaylynn, Ethan, Molly, Hannah, Sara

Title: Down Below

Teacher: Mrs. Sims

Theme: Conservation

Materials and techniques: We created monotype prints on fabric using acrylic paint, gelli plates and stencils. The cyanotype prints were made by mixing potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate together to make a light sensitive chemical that was brushed onto stretched fabric that was attached to a board in a dark room. Once the material dried it was placed in a black plastic bag until it was ready to be exposed to sunlight. The images that were used on the cyanotype prints came from the internet and were manipulated in the photo editing software, Pixlr. The images were converted into an old photograph and then the image was inverted to create a negative. This negative was printed on inkjet transparency paper and then the image was placed over the prepared fabric. It was taken outside and exposed in to the sun for 30-40 minutes. Then the material was taken inside and removed from the board it had been stretched on and washed to get the chemical out. Finally, the fabric was put in a water bath with hydrogen peroxide to stop the fabric from exposing any further. The last step in creating our pieces this year was to arrange all of the pieces that were created and then sew all of the pieces of fabric together.

Did you enjoy this project? We enjoyed working on the pieces for Mammoth Cave and learning new ways to do printmaking.

About: Living close to Mammoth Cave National Park it is a treasure that many take for granted. The beauty that lies above and below the surface of the cave is breathtaking. The ecosystem of the cave and the wildlife and vegetation that make-up the park create a gem that we are blessed to have access to. In our pieces this year we wanted to showcase the complexity of Mammoth Cave National Park and the beauty of the cave, animals and plants. We wanted to show images that people would be familiar with, but to create them in a unique manner. We chose to create the images using cyanotype prints or more commonly known as “sun prints”. These images were sewn together with other pieces of fabric that had been printed using gelli plate to create monotype prints. The composition of the pieces shows the diversity of the park with its images, colors and textures.

Created by Munfordville School, Munfordville, KY

Artists: Joshua, Aryonna, Aline, Debra, Brooklyn, Makayla, Macey, Krysta, Haylee, Audrey, Jaylynn, Ethan, Molly, Hannah, Sara

Title: The Historic Mouth of Mammoth Cave

Teacher: Mrs. Sims

Theme: Conservation

Materials and techniques: We created monotype prints on fabric using acrylic paint, gelli plates and stencils. The cyanotype prints were made by mixing potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate together to make a light sensitive chemical that was brushed onto stretched fabric that was attached to a board in a dark room. Once the material dried it was placed in a black plastic bag until it was ready to be exposed to sunlight. The images that were used on the cyanotype prints came from the internet and were manipulated in the photo editing software, Pixlr. The images were converted into an old photograph and then the image was inverted to create a negative. This negative was printed on inkjet transparency paper and then the image was placed over the prepared fabric. It was taken outside and exposed in to the sun for 30-40 minutes. Then the material was taken inside and removed from the board it had been stretched on and washed to get the chemical out. Finally, the fabric was put in a water bath with hydrogen peroxide to stop the fabric from exposing any further. The last step in creating our pieces this year was to arrange all of the pieces that were created and then sew all of the pieces of fabric together.

Did you enjoy this project? We enjoyed working on the pieces for Mammoth Cave and learning new ways to do printmaking.

About: Living close to Mammoth Cave National Park it is a treasure that many take for granted. The beauty that lies above and below the surface of the cave is breathtaking. The ecosystem of the cave and the wildlife and vegetation that make-up the park create a gem that we are blessed to have access to. In our pieces this year we wanted to showcase the complexity of Mammoth Cave National Park and the beauty of the cave, animals and plants. We wanted to show images that people would be familiar with, but to create them in a unique manner. We chose to create the images using cyanotype prints or more commonly known as “sun prints”. These images were sewn together with other pieces of fabric that had been printed using gelli plate to create monotype prints. The composition of the pieces shows the diversity of the park with its images, colors and textures.

Created by Munfordville School, Munfordville, KY

Artists: Joshua, Aryonna, Aline, Debra, Brooklyn, Makayla, Macey, Krysta, Haylee, Audrey, Jaylynn, Ethan, Molly, Hannah, Sara

Title: Our Favorite Park: Mammoth Cave

Teacher: Mrs. Sims

Theme: Conservation

Materials and techniques: We created monotype prints on fabric using acrylic paint, gelli plates and stencils. The cyanotype prints were made by mixing potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate together to make a light sensitive chemical that was brushed onto stretched fabric that was attached to a board in a dark room. Once the material dried it was placed in a black plastic bag until it was ready to be exposed to sunlight. The images that were used on the cyanotype prints came from the internet and were manipulated in the photo editing software, Pixlr. The images were converted into an old photograph and then the image was inverted to create a negative. This negative was printed on inkjet transparency paper and then the image was placed over the prepared fabric. It was taken outside and exposed in to the sun for 30-40 minutes. Then the material was taken inside and removed from the board it had been stretched on and washed to get the chemical out. Finally, the fabric was put in a water bath with hydrogen peroxide to stop the fabric from exposing any further. The last step in creating our pieces this year was to arrange all of the pieces that were created and then sew all of the pieces of fabric together.

Did you enjoy this project? We enjoyed working on the pieces for Mammoth Cave and learning new ways to do printmaking.

About: Living close to Mammoth Cave National Park it is a treasure that many take for granted. The beauty that lies above and below the surface of the cave is breathtaking. The ecosystem of the cave and the wildlife and vegetation that make-up the park create a gem that we are blessed to have access to. In our pieces this year we wanted to showcase the complexity of Mammoth Cave National Park and the beauty of the cave, animals and plants. We wanted to show images that people would be familiar with, but to create them in a unique manner. We chose to create the images using cyanotype prints or more commonly known as “sun prints”. These images were sewn together with other pieces of fabric that had been printed using gelli plate to create monotype prints. The composition of the pieces shows the diversity of the park with its images, colors and textures.

Created by Munfordville School, Munfordville, KY

Artists: Joshua, Aryonna, Aline, Debra, Brooklyn, Makayla, Macey, Krysta, Haylee, Audrey, Jaylynn, Ethan, Molly, Hannah, Sara

Title: From the New to the Old

Teacher: Mrs. Sims

Theme: Conservation

Materials and techniques: We created monotype prints on fabric using acrylic paint, gelli plates and stencils. The cyanotype prints were made by mixing potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate together to make a light sensitive chemical that was brushed onto stretched fabric that was attached to a board in a dark room. Once the material dried it was placed in a black plastic bag until it was ready to be exposed to sunlight. The images that were used on the cyanotype prints came from the internet and were manipulated in the photo editing software, Pixlr. The images were converted into an old photograph and then the image was inverted to create a negative. This negative was printed on inkjet transparency paper and then the image was placed over the prepared fabric. It was taken outside and exposed in to the sun for 30-40 minutes. Then the material was taken inside and removed from the board it had been stretched on and washed to get the chemical out. Finally, the fabric was put in a water bath with hydrogen peroxide to stop the fabric from exposing any further. The last step in creating our pieces this year was to arrange all of the pieces that were created and then sew all of the pieces of fabric together.

Did you enjoy this project? We enjoyed working on the pieces for Mammoth Cave and learning new ways to do printmaking.

About: Living close to Mammoth Cave National Park it is a treasure that many take for granted. The beauty that lies above and below the surface of the cave is breathtaking. The ecosystem of the cave and the wildlife and vegetation that make-up the park create a gem that we are blessed to have access to. In our pieces this year we wanted to showcase the complexity of Mammoth Cave National Park and the beauty of the cave, animals and plants. We wanted to show images that people would be familiar with, but to create them in a unique manner. We chose to create the images using cyanotype prints or more commonly known as “sun prints”. These images were sewn together with other pieces of fabric that had been printed using gelli plate to create monotype prints. The composition of the pieces shows the diversity of the park with its images, colors and textures.